Pick of the week: Brazilian Diaries with Michael Palin and Alan Charlton – 5 Feb

The John Brooks Memorial Lecture Brazilian Diaries Michael Palin, CBE, FRGS in conversation with Alan Charlton CMG CVO When: Thursday 5 February 2015 18.00 – 19.30 Where: The Beveridge Hall Ground floor, Senate House Malet Street London WC1E 7HU All welcome. RSVP: olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk Michael Palin established his reputation with Monty Python’s Flying Circus and Ripping Yarns. His work also includes several films with Monty Python, as well as The Missionary, A Private Function, an award-winning performance as the hapless Ken in A Fish Called Wanda, American Friends and Fierce Creatures. His television credits include two films for the BBC’s Great Railway Journeys, the plays East of Ipswich and Number 27, and Alan Bleasdale’s GBH. He recently starred in a three part drama for the BBC called Remember Me. He has written books to accompany his eight very successful travel series, including Around the World in 80 Days, Pole to Pole, Full Circle, Sahara and Brazil. He is also the author of a number of children’s stories, the play The Weekend and the novels Hemingway’s Chair and The Truth. In July 2014, Michael, with his fellow Pythons, performed a ten night sell-out show at the 02 Arena – Monty Python Live. Michael was made a CBE in the 2000 New Year’s Honours List for services to television drama and travel. In 2002, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the British Comedy Awards. In 2005, he was given a BAFTA Special Award and in 2013 he was awarded the BAFTA Fellowship. Between 2009 and 2012, Michael was President of the Royal Geographical Society. Alan Charlton was British Ambassador to Brazil 2008-2013. He continues his association with Brazil and Latin America through the Robin Humphreys Fellowship. He also advises De Montfort University on their Latin America strategy as a consultant and governor and holds advisory board memberships of the Brazil Institute, King’s College London, and ILAS. He has founded the British-Brazilian Conversa, a bilateral...

#PotW: The afterlife of Cicero – 7-8 May

A conference organised by the Warburg Institute, the Institute of Classical Studies and UCL. The conference will be held at the Warburg Institute. The conference will explore the impact of Cicero’s writings and personality on intellectual and cultural history, on the visual arts, philosophy, politics, rhetoric and literature. Since so much of Cicero’s writings is extant, they cover a wide variety of genres and topics, and we are also able to get a glimpse of his personality from his letters, Cicero has had an enormous influence on western culture. By examining a diverse series of significant case studies, the conference aims to make a contribution to assessing Cicero’s impact more fully.  The proceedings will be jointly published by the two Institutes as Supplements to the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies. Organisers:  Peter Mack (Warwick), John North (UCL), Gesine Manuwald (UCL) and Maria Wyke (UCL) Speakers: Virginia Cox (New York), Nina Dubin (Illinois at Chicago), Katherine East (Royal Holloway London), Lynn Fotheringham (Nottingham), Matthew Fox (Glasgow), Luke Houghton (Reading), Catherine Keen (UCL), Andrew Laird (Warwick), Carole Mabboux (Savoie), David Marsh (Rutgers), Martin McLaughlin (Oxford) and Laura Refe (Venice) Read the whole programme and register here (by 5 May). When: 7 – 8 May 2015 Where: Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H...

Beyond the digital humanities

On 5 May, the School of Advanced Study (SAS) is hosting ‘Beyond the Digital Humanities’, the final in a series of important events on the future of digital humanities organised by the European Science Foundation (ESF) research network NeDiMAH (Network for Digital Methods in the Arts and Humanities). It will be chaired by Professor Lorna Hughes (below left), SAS’s first chair in digital humanities and Professor Andrew Prescott from the University of Glasgow. Since May 2011, NeDiMAH has run a programme of activities and built a collaborative research forum to investigate the use of digital methods in arts and humanities research. The network has explored key areas of theory and practice in a number of methodological areas, including: the analysis of time and space, visualisation, linked data, large-scale data analysis, editing, manuscript imaging, temporal modeling and scholarly communications. The reach of these events has been documented in a series of maps of digital humanities activities across Europe. This has allowed the Network to get a sense of the diversity of practice as well as understand and demonstrate the collaborative and trans-national nature of digital humanities and the integration of digital approaches into all aspects of the research lifecycle. Our objective has been to understand better the impact that digital methods have had on transforming scholarship in the arts and humanities, and the potential for extending the benefits of digital research to the creative industries, industry and public policy and planning. Collaboration has been key. And this has ranged from working with scientific and technical disciplines, data science and libraries to archives and museums, existing European research infrastructures (including CLARIN and DARIAH in...

#PotW: Legally navigating academic blogging and social media – 29 April

This month at the Social Scholar seminar we will be joined by Dr Judith Townend who will be looking at social media and legal concerns. Here a little information by Judith about what can be expected: “While social media tools are fantastically liberating for academic communication, users need to be aware of the legal and ethical context. Those trained in journalism or law will probably be aware of the most important media and communication-related laws, but my research suggests there are many bloggers and social media users who are uncertain about the boundaries of legitimate speech. What’s more, the complexity of UK media law (and high cost of resolving a civil dispute) makes it an uncertain environment for even the most experienced and legally astute. My contribution to the Social Scholar series will discuss the main legal issues for academic bloggers and social media users, point towards useful guides, and offer some thoughts on how legal resources and systems might be improved.” Speaker: Dr Judith Townend (SAS) Time: Wednesday 29 April 2015, 1pm-2pm Location: Room 246 (Senate House, 2nd Floor) All welcome! No prior registration needed. For full details check out our Event...

Legally navigating academic blogging and social media (Social Scholar – 29 April 2015)

This month at the Social Scholar seminar we will be joined by Dr Judith Townend who will be looking at social media and legal concerns. For full details check out our Event Page. Title: Legally navigating academic blogging and social media Speaker: Dr Judith Townend (SAS) Time: Wednesday 29 April 2015, 1pm-2pm Location: Room 246 (Senate House) As per  usual we asked our speaker if they would answer a few questions for us.   Could you tell us about yourself? I’m director of the Centre for Law and Information Policy at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies; I joined the IALS/SAS in October 2014, and the Centre officially launched in February 2015 with an academic workshop and public lecture. What are your views on the use of social media in academia and higher education? I’m a great advocate of using social media to enhance academic work: at a research stage (for developing ideas, gathering data), as well as for sharing results and output with fellow scholars, practitioners with relevant interests, students and the wider public. Proponents of ‘open’ journalism have long recognised that sharing the journalistic process as well as the product can yield rich social rewards; this approach can be adopted in academia as well.  What can we expect from you at the Social Scholar? While social media tools are fantastically liberating for academic communication, users need to be aware of the legal and ethical context. Those trained in journalism or law will probably be aware of the most important media and communication-related laws, but my research suggests there are many bloggers and social media users who are uncertain about the boundaries of legitimate...

Introducing the SAS theme for Being Human 2015 – Hidden and Revealed

Working in the humanities means uncovering fascinating secrets and stories. It means challenging received ideas, and finding new perspectives on histories, cultures and languages. It means working with archives and collections, and gaining access to places, ideas and knowledge that are often off-limits and ‘hidden’ for the vast majority of people. In 2015, we want to share the excitement and intrigue of working in the humanities with the broadest possible public. In doing so, we also want to learn from them. With this aim in mind, the theme that we have settled on for this year’s SAS and Senate House Library contribution to the Being Human festival of the humanities is Hidden and Revealed. People are invited to respond to this theme freely and imaginatively. Possible points of departure however might include the capacity of the humanities to: Reveal hidden and forgotten narratives, cultures, histories, and languages. Reveal hidden spaces/places/locations. Reveal new ways of understanding and probing difficult problems. Reveal new ways of seeing, understanding, questioning. Reveal new perspectives on life, death and other core aspects of ‘being human’. Reveal and challenge secrets, censorship, and things that people would rather keep hidden! The humanities have an immense capacity to explore and reveal the secrets of the human condition – the essence of what it means to ‘be human’. For the Being Human festival 2015 we want to celebrate the huge range of work that is being done in this field within SAS/SHL itself.   Opportunities: A number of direct opportunities to get involved with the Being Human festival will be revealed very soon. In the meantime if you have...

#PotW: The Life & Work of Jonathan Coe, 28 April

A Brunel Centre for Contemporary Writing (BCCW) Symposium: The Life & Work of Jonathan Coe  Featuring keynote speakers: Jonathan Coe (critic, novelist, and critic);  Vanessa Guignery (Ecole Normale Supérieure, Lyon, & Member of the Institut Universitaire de France); and, Merritt Moseley (University of North Carolina Asheville). This symposium features the work of Jonathan Coe, one of Britain’s most significant contemporary authors. His prize-winning work What a Carve Up! reaches the twenty-first anniversary of its publication which landmark this one-day event celebrates. Coe will offer a reading, a talk and answer questions from participants. Speakers: Jonathan Coe (critic, novelist, and critic) Nick Bentley (Keele University) Vanessa Guignery (Ecole Normale Supérieure, Lyon, & Member of the Institut Universitaire de France) KEYNOTE Rod Mengham (Jesus College, Cambridge) Merritt Moseley (University of North Carolina Asheville) KEYNOTE Emma Parker (Leicester University) David Quantick (Author) Philip Tew (Brunel University London) Joe Brooker (Birkbeck College) José Ramón Prado Pérez (La Universitat Jaume I, Castellón de la Plana, Spain) Organizers: Prof. Philip Tew & Dr. Nick Hubble (Brunel University London) When: 28 April 2015, 09:00 – 18:00 Where: Deller Hall (Senate House, basement), Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU Find out more and register...

#PotW: Aestheticism and Decadence in the Age of Modernism: 1895 to 1945, 17/8 April

This interdisciplinary conference intends to open discussions about the meaning and significance of Aestheticism and Decadence as these movements evolved between 1895 and the mid-twentieth century. Aestheticism and Decadence were not vanquished with Wilde’s imprisonment but, rather, continued as vital and diverse forms in twentieth century aesthetics and culture. Their influence was in some cases openly acknowledged by the authors in question, but often it was oblique and obscured as many later writers, most famously the High Modernists, eschewed any admissions of such a debt. When: 17 April 2015, 09:30 – 18 April 2015 17:30 Where: Institute of English Studies, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU Read the full programme and register...

Digital imaging and manuscripts event at the National Library of Wales

This free event is being organised by Professor Lorna Hughes, SAS’s chair in digital humanities, and Professor Andrew Prescott, AHRC digital transformations theme fellow at the University of Glasgow. It will acknowledge the long tradition of the use of scientific aids in manuscript investigations, and also address the opportunities provided by new and emerging technologies such as RTI imaging and Synchrotron light sources. Among the discussion topics on the agenda are how research outputs can be made available for analysis by a wider range of researchers, the role of cultural heritage organisations (who must provide access to new types of digital images), and the preservation issues raised by repeated re-examination of ancient manuscripts using different techniques. The event is sponsored by the ESF Network for Digital Methods in the Arts and Humanities (NeDiMAH) and the Arts and Humanities Research Council Theme Leader Fellowship in Digital Transformations. A limited number of travel bursaries for postgraduates and early career researchers are available. Please contact Lorna Hughes for details: lorna.hughes@sas.ac.uk. When: 30 March–1 April, 2015 Where: National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth, and Roderic Bowen Library, University of Wales Trinity St David, Lampeter, Wales. There is no charge to attend the workshop, but registration is essential via Eventbrite  ...

#PotW: London and the First World War – 20/1 March

As part of events to commemorate the centenary of the First World War, IWM (Imperial War Museums) in partnership with the Centre for Metropolitan History is organising a major conference that will explore the ways in which London and its inhabitants were affected by, and involved with, the 1914-18 conflict. For the first time London was effectively on the front line, subject to aerial bombing and surveillance, whilst its streets, buildings and spaces were shaped by the needs of mass mobilisation, supply and defence. The war had an impact upon everyday life in the capital in other ways too, including the economy, governance, standards of living, culture, leisure, the physical environment and social life. Read the full programme When: 20 March 2015, 09:00 – 21 March 2015 18:00 Where: Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU (20 March) and at IWM London, Lambeth Road, London SE1 6HZ (21 March) Register...

Social Scholar (18 March 2015) Using Social Media for a National Festival (and Learning how to engage online)

This month at the Social Scholar seminar we are going to look at social media campaigns for national festivals as an example of what can work well and what can be learnt from such campaigns. This should prove to be a useful session for those using or planning to use social media to promote and discuss events and projects. For full details check out our Event Page and register your interest to attend. Title: Using Social Media for a National Festival (and Learning how to engage online) Speaker: Dr Michael Eades (SAS) Time: Wednesday 18 March 2015, 1pm-2pm Location: Room 243 (Senate House) Our speaker this week is Dr Michael Eades (School of Advanced Study) and as usual we asked him to answer a few questions for us. SAS:Hello Michael. Thank you for agreeing to talk with us. Firstly, could you tell us a little more about yourself? Michael: I am the School of Advanced Study’s Cultural & Public Engagement Research Fellow, more often described as the SAS ‘Public Engagement Person’. I do various things in SAS, including my own research on the Festival in a Box project, but primarily I curate the School’s major outlet for public engagement activity: the Being Human festival of the humanities.  Being Human is the UK’s only national festival of the humanities, and featured over 160 events across the country in 2014, hosted by around 100 universities and cultural organisations. I’ve worked primarily in cultural and public engagement roles for just over two years now since completing my PhD at the University of Nottingham in 2012. My thesis looked at theories of community...