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Events


#PoTW – BBC2: Origins; Influence; Audiences: A 50th Anniversary Conference

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Hullaballoo and Custard © BBC

Hullaballoo and Custard © BBC

On the 20th April 1964 the BBC launched its second television channel: BBC2. Although the launch was a flop (due to a major power cut) the station soon became a fixture of UK broadcasting. This conference engages with the example of BBC2 in a contribution to the history of how, as well as what, we access through television.

In the 1960s questions were raised about the increasingly dominant role of television in the home and the part the Pilkington Committee played in preserving middle- and upper-class values in the medium. It was also the first channel in the UK to offer UHF, then colour, television, changing the way that television was produced, broadcast and consumed.
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#PoTW – A State of Our Own: Second Independence, Federalism and the Decolonisation of the State in Africa

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Map showing dates of Decolonisation and Independence in Africa

Map showing dates of Decolonisation and Independence in Africa

The lecture interrogates the intriguing features of statehood and politics in Africa. It argues that the decolonisation process in Africa is incomplete without the liberation of the state which retains its colonial cast and remains the locus and embodiment of colonisation. This process is already underway in different forms and at various stages all over the continent under the banner of second independence movements whose object is the appropriation, realignment and reorientation of states that constituents can genuinely call their own. Briefly stated, second independence aims at decolonisation, something first independence failed to do. Given the primacy of the deep cleavages of ethnicity, regionalism and religion to the political contestations and demands of the second independence ferment to reclaim the state, the lecture makes a case for federalism operationalised as a variety of federal solutions, as the most suitable political framework for decolonising the state.
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PoTW – Virginia Woolf and Visual Culture

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Portrait of Virginia Woolf (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941)

Portrait of Virginia Woolf (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941)

One-day conference hosted by the Institute of English Studies for the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain, incorporating the 16th AGM of the VWSGB

Confirmed Speakers

Wendy Hitchmough: Dr Wendy Hitchmough is the Head of Historic Buildings and Research at Historic Royal Palaces. For twelve years she was Curator at the Bloomsbury artists’ home, Charleston, in East Sussex. As an art historian she specialises in the art and architecture of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. She is the author of seven books including Arts and Crafts Gardens (V&A 2005) and C.F.A. Voysey (Phaidon 1995).

Claire Nicholson: Claire Nicholson is a part-time Lecturer in English Literature at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, where this year she was awarded her PhD for a thesis entitled ‘In Woolf’s Clothing: an exploration of clothes and fashion in the fiction of Virginia Woolf’. She has published articles on various aspects of Bloomsbury and fashion, and her most recent publication is Volume 1 of The Women Aesthetes (London: Pickering & Chatto, 2013), which she co-edited with Prof. Mary Joannou.

Sarah Phillips: Sarah Phillips has been a keen supporter of the Charleston Trust since 1992 and a member of the Virginia Woolf Society. Her main career was spent at the Courtauld Institute of Art where she organised many events for the Friends, including several lecture series on Bloomsbury. In 2007, she turned from museum work and art history interests, to an MA in English Literature 1848- 1930. Her thesis was on Virginia Woolf as a Cubist Writer. In 2012, a shorter version was published as a monograph by Cecil Woolf for his Bloomsbury Heritage series. Sarah now works as a freelance lecturer; event organiser and tutor for the WEA in Bath, Wiltshire, Somerset & Cornwall.
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PoTW: Translating Cultures – 28-29/03/14

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shutterstock_41124580The AHRC’s themes provide a funding focus for emerging areas of interest to arts and humanities researchers. In recognizing that interdisciplinary and collaborative research often requires particular forms of support to develop its full potential, themed funding is particularly supportive of developmental activity, partnership-based activities, and innovative approaches.

The ‘Translating Cultures’ theme addresses the need for understanding and communication within, between and across diverse cultures in a world seen to be increasingly characterized by transnational and globalized connections. It funds research that studies the role of translation, understood in its broadest sense, in the transmission, interpretation, transformation and sharing of languages, values, beliefs, histories and narratives.
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PoTW – Online learning: Developing trends

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Social ScholarOnline Learning: Developing trends. User expectations of what learning is and how it is offered and supported are changing dramatically and rapidly. Remaining relevant is the most significant challenge for organisations working in this new world. How might we respond to these challenges.

This month, for the Social Scholar, Myles Runham, Head of Online, BBC Academy will be talking with us about his experience of using social media. The BBC has long created online education and learning content but the promotional and discoverability side of this is less widely discussed. This seminar, therefore, offers us an opportunity to find out how the BBC uses social media, why they use it, and what benefits they expect to gain from it.
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