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#PotW Literary London annual lecture 23 July

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LitLonLogo(1)Bernardine Evaristo: ‘London, Londinium, Londolo: The Endless Possibilities of Re-Imagining London’

My fiction, verse fiction and poetry are strongly rooted in various imaginings of London, from the pre-historical settlement of early man in my poem, Routes, to the escapades of a black Roman girl living it up in Londinium in my verse novel, The Emperor’s Babe. In the parallel universe of my novel, Blonde Roots, London becomes the African city of Londolo; the semi-autobiographical verse novel Lara,spans 150 years of my family’s migrations; in Hello Mum, London is seen through the eyes of a fourteen year old boy living on a housing estate; and Mr Loverman, is the story of a 74 year old black gay man who has lived in the city for fifty years. This talk will dig deep into the city as source of inspiration with illustrative readings from the books.

Award-winning author Bernardine Evaristo’s seven books of fiction and verse fiction include Mr Loverman (Penguin 2013), Lara (Bloodaxe 2009), Blonde Roots (Penguin 2008) and The Emperor’s Babe (Penguin 2001). Two of her novels have been adapted into BBC R4 plays since 2012.  She is a literary critic, editor, writer for radio and has judged many literary prizes. She is Reader in Creative Writing at Brunel University, London and teaches the UEA-Guardian How to Tell a Story course. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and the Royal Society of Arts, and she was made an MBE in 2009. 

Venue: Senate House

Date and time: 23 July 2014, 18:15 – 19:30

Find out more on the Institute of English Studies website

Lecture attendance free.  For more information on the Literacy London full conference click here. 

#PotW Music Literature, Historiography and Aesthetics

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shutterstock_101040352Though the relationship between music and words has occupied a prominent position in philosophical and aesthetic discourse on the arts since antiquity, the historiography of this relationship have received far less attention, and the broad area of ‘words about music’ or music literature generally, remains understudied. Significant recent scholarship however, has signalled the emerging importance of this area of study, and the conference aims to provide a forum for consolidated interdisciplinary discussion in this area, and to highlight and focus its innovative methodological potential that can be applied more broadly within musicology and literary and historical studies.

Convened by:

Dr Paul Watt (Monash University)

Dr Sarah Collins (University of New South Wales)

Dr Michael Allis (University of Leeds)

Find out more on the Institute of Musical Research event pages 

Venue: Senate House (various rooms)

Date: 17 July -18 July

Register here

#PotW – Non-traditional Slaveholding in the Atlantic World 11-12 July

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Old illustration of slaves in Unyamwezi region, Tanzania. 1864.

Studies of slaveholding in the Atlantic World traditionally imagine a particular type of slave holder – a wealthy landowning white man who has extensive political and cultural power, his status in the community defined by or at least enhanced by his slaveholding. He has a set of attitudes towards his slaves and their economic and cultural work that he shares with others of his class. This conference sets out to challenge these preconceptions by bringing together scholars working on different regions of the Atlantic world to discuss a hitherto neglected area of the study of African American slavery: non-traditional slaveholding.

Convenor: Dr Catherine Armstrong, Manchester Metropolitan University

Conference Organisers:
Lawrence Aje (University of Montpellier)
Catherine Armstrong (Manchester Metropolitan University)
Lydia Plath (Canterbury Christ Church University).

Find out more on the  Institute of Latin American Studies website

Full programme

Date and time: 11-12 July 2014
Venue: Room G22/26 (Ground Floor), Senate House, London WC1E 7HU
Register here.

#PotW – The Great War at Home 3-4 July

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shutterstock_87046109Fought across the world, the First World War struck deepest at home. Few neighbourhoods, villages, towns or regions emerged untouched by the global conflict on 1914-18. This year’s Anglo-American conference takes as its theme the impact of the First World War on the locality and local institutions, on the family and social life, and on the memorialisation of war in the built environment and in private life.

Co-organised with the British Association of Local History, the Victoria County History and the American Association for State and Local History, the conference aims to be an international festival of local history seen through the lens of war. Our focus is not restricted to the UK, but will cover ‘home fronts’ across the world, including those of Britain’s empire, allies and other combatant nations. The conference is also keen to show-case current research projects relating to the First World War, the teaching of the history of the Great War, and the 1914-18 period in the media, visual arts and museum world then and now. Our plenary lecturers include Jay Winter (Yale), Bill Nasson (Stellenbosch University), John Horne (Trinity College Dublin) and Christine Hallett (Manchester).

Programme day 1 – Thursday 3rd July
Programme day 2 – Friday 4th July

Date and time: 03–04 July 2014
Venue: Senate House, London WC1E 7HU
Register here.

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#PotW – Modernism Now! BAMS International Conference 26–28 June

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modernism-nowModernism Now! is a three-day international, interdisciplinary conference organised by the British Association for Modernist Studies, designed to explore modernisms throughout the late nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  The conference aims to discuss the past achievements of modernism, its possible futures, and to provide a review of current activity in the field. In Modernism and Theory, Neil Levi has recently suggested that in thinking about modernism we consider ‘the idea of a contemporary perpetuation of artistic modernism’ and that we see ‘modernist works as events whose implications demand continued investigation.’

Modernism Now! will explore these issues in three distinct ways:

• The conference aims to represent the diversity of modernisms, and calls for papers assessing modernist writers, artists, texts and performances from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds, methodological standpoints, and theoretical perspectives.
• The conference will explore the ongoing use of ‘modernism’ as a cultural, philosophical, and artistic category, analysing how and where modernism functions as a continuing aesthetic in the twenty-first century, across multiple disciplines, geographies, and traditions.
• The conference hopes to provide a review of current research in modernist studies, inviting panels and papers (joint or individual) that report on the work of research projects, editions, exhibitions, societies, and institutions.

The conference is open to anyone working on modernism, with reduced registration for BAMS members.

Full programme

Date and time: 26–28 June 2014
Venue: Institute of English Studies, Senate House, London WC1E 7HU
Register here.

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