Legally navigating academic blogging and social media (Social Scholar – 29 April 2015)

This month at the Social Scholar seminar we will be joined by Dr Judith Townend who will be looking at social media and legal concerns. For full details check out our Event Page. Title: Legally navigating academic blogging and social media Speaker: Dr Judith Townend (SAS) Time: Wednesday 29 April 2015, 1pm-2pm Location: Room 246 (Senate House) As per  usual we… Continue reading Legally navigating academic blogging and social media (Social Scholar – 29 April 2015)

Introducing the SAS theme for Being Human 2015 – Hidden and Revealed

Working in the humanities means uncovering fascinating secrets and stories. It means challenging received ideas, and finding new perspectives on histories, cultures and languages. It means working with archives and collections, and gaining access to places, ideas and knowledge that are often off-limits and ‘hidden’ for the vast majority of people. In 2015, we want… Continue reading Introducing the SAS theme for Being Human 2015 – Hidden and Revealed

#PotW: The Life & Work of Jonathan Coe, 28 April

A Brunel Centre for Contemporary Writing (BCCW) Symposium: The Life & Work of Jonathan Coe  Featuring keynote speakers: Jonathan Coe (critic, novelist, and critic);  Vanessa Guignery (Ecole Normale Supérieure, Lyon, & Member of the Institut Universitaire de France); and, Merritt Moseley (University of North Carolina Asheville). This symposium features the work of Jonathan Coe, one… Continue reading #PotW: The Life & Work of Jonathan Coe, 28 April

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Doing Quantitative Research in the Humanities

Data can be described as quantitative if it can be measured or identified on a numerical scale. Examples include length, height, area, volume, weight, speed, age, distance, cost and so on. However, not all data using numbers is quantitative: Datasets are often classified into categorical data, i.e. using numbers as descriptors. Arithmetic performed on the… Continue reading Doing Quantitative Research in the Humanities

British Library’s Magna Carta exhibition is ‘nutritious food for thought’, says medieval history expert

This is an extract from a review of the British Library’s Magna Carta exhibition written by Dr John Sabapathy for the Reviews in History website, which is run by the Institute of Historical Research. The lecturer in medieval history at University College London, thinks the exhibition has a great deal for those interested in the medieval… Continue reading British Library’s Magna Carta exhibition is ‘nutritious food for thought’, says medieval history expert